Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful for fear you let other people spend it for you. Carl Sandburg

Choose your own priorities.  We often drift through days that are full of things we “have to do” or “should do” or what others “want us to do.”  Why?  There are plenty of people out there more than willing to put in their two cents about your time.  Every day, you’ll hear sales pitches about the endless options you have and other people’s opinion of what should be important to you.  Have they got their own lives in such perfect order that it qualifies them to make decisions for yours?  Like any purchase, it’s valuable to listen but keep that coin in your pocket till YOU decide where it will be spent.  Try to see the difference between a real obligation and an imagined one.  The only things you have to do are the obligations you choose.  You might find that more is optional than you really think.

I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see. J. Buroughs

If he felt this way at the start of the 20th century, imagine what he would think today.  We have the freedom to do more now than ever before.  But more options can bring more frustration, because more options can bring more frustration, because we can still see all of the things we don’t have time for.  Before you plan another day/week/month/year, write this thought at the top of the paper: I Cannot Do Everything.  It’s a truth that applies today even more than it did 100 years ago.  Life becomes easier when you accept the fact that you will never be able to do everything you want.  Once that happens, you can start to look at what you want to do the MOST, and plan accordingly.  Priorities bring peace of mind.  They help you relax, knowing  that you’re doing all you can by making the most of your opportunity.  Low priorities are the seeds of wasted time.  And days don’t need any help getting shorter.

You’ll never miss the water till the well runs dry.

You’ll never miss the water ’till the well runs dry.  W.C. Handy

Ever taken someone or something for granted?  How did it feel when the person you depended on was gone?  It’s easy to appreciate what you have once it’s gone.  The difficult task is to appreciate what we have while we still have it.  Take the time to thank a friend for being there.  Talk to your parents, to your sister, to your brother, your children, or grandchildren.  Instead of wishing you had more and better possessions, try to think of the people who would love to have what you have.  By learning to appreciate what you have now; it will be less of a shock once it’s gone.  So take time today to cherish what you have, because it could be gone by tomorrow.